Why a Healthy Confidence is Key to Everything


This post is by Bryan Kramer from Bryan Kramer


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‘Be confident!’ It makes perfect sense when you see it written down but managing to harness the power of the terrifically useful but often elusive concept of confidence is…easier said than done.
One thing’s for sure though, it’s useful as… The post Why a Healthy Confidence is Key to Everything appeared first on Bryan Kramer.

Crisis Communications


This post is by Jim Horton from Online Public Relations Thoughts


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The CEO of Boeing is engaged in crisis communications these days.  The money-maker for the company, the 737 Max, has turned into a dead loss.  He has little choice but to stand by the plane while investigations into its software continue and the company rolls out fixes.  It's a tough position to be in.  Negative stories about the company and its practices are piling up.  There are accusations of sloppiness in manufacturing, of a rush to get the plane into production to compete with Airbus, of poor engineering that relied on a single sensor rather than several.  This is a time when a CEO must stand up and defend his people and the company while seeing that errors are corrected.  It's a hard job filled with stress, especially the unknowns that might rise to make matters worse.  If the CEO were to hide, Boeing could be hurt irreparably.  

In Search Of A Mission


This post is by Jim Horton from Online Public Relations Thoughts


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The Federal Aviation Administration has approved the first drone delivery service to work as an airline.  The company will now start testing in Virginia and elsewhere.  It strikes one as a technology in search of a mission. There is little to show so far that drones will add enough marketing power to a business that they are worth the expense.  In rural Africa they have been useful in delivering medicines that are hard to distribute in any other way, but the US has the infrastructure needed to get from place to place quickly.  In any event, drones are unlikely to be useful in urban environments among apartment buildings and skyscrapers where delivery to a specific location is hard to achieve.  Delivery drones are a gleam in the eyes of technologists who are convinced the aerial vehicles can be better, faster and cheaper than other methods. Continue reading "In Search Of A Mission"

Phony


This post is by Jim Horton from Online Public Relations Thoughts


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Companies sometimes try to get away with things in marketing that PR can't abide.  Consider AT&T.  It has branded its 4G mobile network 5G E in an effort to make the public believe it is already offering 5G speeds.  It isn't even though sophisticated users have been fooled.  The media are bashing the company for its fraud, and well they should.  It's blatant deception.  What causes companies to engage in such risky behavior?  AT&T is feeling the breath of competition and is trying to stay ahead of Verizon, which already has rolled out true 5G in a number of cities.  It's hard to steal a march by lying, especially with the media watching.  AT&T is doing it anyway, and one wonders why regulators haven't descended on them with fines and orders to stop. There is no excuse for such behavior.

Crowded


This post is by Jim Horton from Online Public Relations Thoughts


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A 19th Democratic candidate for President has made his intentions known and the field has turned into a cattle call.  There is no way that most will be able to rise above anonymity with voters, and the field will shrink as candidates run out of money and time.  From a PR perspective, it is an exercise in democracy.  From a marketing perspective, it is a disaster for both front-runners and followers alike.  It would be better if there were but two or three candidates who were able to raise funds for serious campaigning and pay attention to voters' issues.  Now it is a babble drowning each other and confusing the electorate.  The crowded conditions cannot last and won't, but the longer they are an issue, the harder it will be for a strong candidate to emerge before the next election.

Social Media Update 22.04.19


This post is by Boyd Neil from Boyd Neil


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A weekly annotated curation of significant social web platform developments from the previous week, with links and carping marginalia as needed . . . Posted every Monday morning or thereabouts.  

          <img class="thumb-image" data-image="https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/t/5cb87b1f53450a613c97441f/1555594019964/Screen+Shot+2019-04-18+at+9.26.44+AM.png" data-image-dimensions="789x332" data-image-focal-point="0.5,0.5" alt="Screen Shot 2019-04-18 at 9.26.44 AM.png" data-load="false" data-image-id="5cb87b1f53450a613c97441f" data-type="image" src="https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/t/5cb87b1f53450a613c97441f/1555594019964/Screen+Shot+2019-04-18+at+9.26.44+AM.png?format=1000w" />

Love the Numbers

Distil Networks published its 2019 Bad Bot Report last week that looks at the current state of automated web traffic, both good and bad. “Legitimate bot traffic (like, for example, the scrapers travel sites use to identify flight deals) as well as ill-intentioned bots (like those used to conduct denial-of-service attacks)” are compared in the report. One of the most startling findings, from my perspective anyway, is that most bad bot traffic originates in the United States not Russia as most people assume.

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Facebook

The Verge is reporting that app researcher Jane Manchun Wong has discovered Facebook testing “a radically redesigned interface for its app, which sees the News Feed and Stories feature combined into a single feed Continue reading "Social Media Update 22.04.19"

Bumbling


This post is by Jim Horton from Online Public Relations Thoughts


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Once an organization gets on the wrong side of an issue, it often takes a long time to correct course.  Consider Facebook and privacy.  The company has been under public censure for more than a year over the issue and now it seems to have botched its path forward again.  The repeated mistakes give the impression of an outfit that is bumbling, unable to "walk and chew gum at the same time."  This is surely not the case but perception seems to make it so.  Facebook is not the only corporation that can't seem to make things right.  Wells Fargo, the major bank, is beleaguered by continuous revelations of wrongdoing on the part of its employees.   Bumbling is humiliating for CEOs.  It shows the limits of their influence.  They may direct but their messages might not reach every level where employees Continue reading "Bumbling"

Using Livestreaming to Grow Your Brand, Community, & Influence


This post is by Guest Contributor from Shonali Burke Consulting


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livestreamingGuest Post by Ai Addyson-Zhang Imagine this: You’re about to go on stage in front of thousands of people. You do this every single week. You’ve got a loyal fanbase that follows you around the world. You are a global traveler and thought leader. People are excited to hear what you have to say on your topic and field. You find yourself becoming a “big deal” in your field. Does this sound like a dream? Like this only happens to “famous” people? Let me tell you, friends, that with the power of social media and technology, this can be a reality. It can happen to anyone who knows how to leverage technology to their advantage. I know, because it happened for me. Over the past two years, I have significantly grown my online community through the power of livestreaming and video content. I did it all through the comfort of
Ai Zhang
Continue reading "Using Livestreaming to Grow Your Brand, Community, & Influence"

PR Disaster


This post is by Jim Horton from Online Public Relations Thoughts


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Samsung is trumpeting a foldable phone, but the device handed out only to journalists for testing have been failing.  Some of the faults are due to removal of an essential layer covering the screen, but others were outright crashes.  This is a PR disaster for Samsung.  If the company puts the phone into production, it will have to fight the perception that it is buggy and its screens go blank. One wonders how much the company tested the phone before sending it to the media.  Whatever the time length, it was not enough.  Samsung can come back from this disaster, but it will do so if its foldable phones rarely fail for anyone at any time in the future.

The Deep Work of CX and Digital Transformation


This post is by Brian Solis from Brian Solis


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On 16 April 2019, I was invited by my dear friend Ross Quintana to join the popular, weekly Adobe series “#AdobeChat.” I have to say that it was one of the fastest hours I’d experienced in a long time. In this conversation, we, along with countless forward-thinking executives, discussed “The Deep Work of CX and Digital Transformation.” Of course, I peppered in a bit about Lifescale and how it affects employees and customers. Below, I’ve collected Adobe’s questions along with my answers to share with you here. There are also, hundreds of exceptional responses that are also worth your time. I hope this helps you in your work… — Hello! Thank you for having me as your guest today! #AdobeChat @Adobe @AdobeExpCloud Q1: Definition: #Digitaltransformation is the pursuit of innovative & agile business & operational models — fueled by evolving technologies, processes, analytics & talent capabilities —
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Continue reading "The Deep Work of CX and Digital Transformation"

Not Good


This post is by Jim Horton from Online Public Relations Thoughts


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It has been more than 300 days since the Pentagon has given a press briefing.  That is not smart PR. The public should know what the military is thinking, not the least because it is such a large part of taxpayer funds.  Press briefings also humanize the military -- put faces to names and provide a better understanding of strategy, allies and foes.  In a time of terrorists, unfriendly countries with nuclear weapons and rising dictatorships, the public depends more than ever on a properly functioning military.  Citing security risks of being seen in public is not enough of a reason to duck the media.  Yes, reporters ask tough questions but the Pentagon should be ready to answer them.  If the Brass are taking their cue from President Trump, that is yet another harm he causing to public discourse.  

The Way It Is Now


This post is by Jim Horton from Online Public Relations Thoughts


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The internet has made celebrity a peril. It opens a sluice for trolls, haters and the disgruntled to vent at a notable person.  It doesn't matter whether the individual deserves recognition or not.  Consider the case of Katie Bouman, a young computer scientist from MIT who led a  team that developed software to develop the first picture of a black hole.  MIT tweeted about her contributions then a storm of praise and blame ignited.  Her name was exalted and dragged through the mud at the same time.  She asked for none of this and had made abundantly clear she was part of a team that developed the algorithm. No matter.  It became ugly, and she had to turn off her phone to stop the barrage of messages.  Bouman almost certainly wishes MIT had never tweeted in the first place.  She didn't Continue reading "The Way It Is Now"

Too Soon


This post is by Jim Horton from Online Public Relations Thoughts


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Israelis made the mistake of celebrating a moon landing too soon.  The spacecraft, Beresheet, crashed onto its surface while the world watched.  The vehicle carried the hopes and dreams of the nation, but it was not to be.  There was probably little that could have been done to tamp down expectations. The best that can be done in situations like this is to emphasize the difficulty of the achievement beforehand.  That way, no one is surprised if it doesn't come to pass.  That has been the history of landing on Mars.  There have been so many failures to settle safely on the red planet that mission control is wired with tension in the final minutes of a descent.  The moon is considered easier to do, but to date, only a few countries have achieved it.  Israelis will get another chance, but the next time, they will be more cautious.

Social Media Update 15.04.19


This post is by Boyd Neil from Boyd Neil


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




A weekly annotated curation of significant social web platform developments from the previous week, with links and carping marginalia as needed . . . Posted every Monday morning or thereabouts.  
          <img class="thumb-image" data-image="https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/t/5caf5db4f4e1fcc71a6edfcb/1554996666442/Screen+Shot+2019-04-11+at+11.29.57+AM.png" data-image-dimensions="388x367" data-image-focal-point="0.5,0.5" alt="Screen Shot 2019-04-11 at 11.29.57 AM.png" data-load="false" data-image-id="5caf5db4f4e1fcc71a6edfcb" data-type="image" src="https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/t/5caf5db4f4e1fcc71a6edfcb/1554996666442/Screen+Shot+2019-04-11+at+11.29.57+AM.png?format=1000w" />
This will surprise many and delight Mark Zuckerberg at Facebook, but all the mumbling and complaining about Facebook , fake news and hate content have had virtually no impact on Facebook’s usage among U.S. adults. As the Pew Research Center reports, “The shares of adults who say they use Facebook, Pinterest, LinkedIn and Twitter are each largely the same as in 2016, with only Instagram showing an uptick in use during this time period.” Only Facebook use among teens has dropped over the past few years, which, I am hazarding a guess here, is unlikely a consequence of the fake news and Facebook’s misuse of data debate. ***********************************

Twitter

In an effort to constrain spam, Twitter earlier this year Continue reading "Social Media Update 15.04.19"

Reality Sets In


This post is by Jim Horton from Online Public Relations Thoughts


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There has been enormous hype and publicity surrounding self-driving cars, and companies around the world are pursuing the technology.  But one corporation, Ford, has come clean and is now saying we won't see them anytime soon.  The reality of the complexity of self-driving vehicles has set in.  Even Waymo, which has spent billions pursuing the autonomous car, hasn't rolled out its self-driving machines except in isolated spots in Arizona.  The hype got ahead of itself.  Now, companies must do the hard work of making self-driving practical.  That may be impossible.  There are too many conditions on roadways from the elements -- fog, rain, snow, brilliant sunshine -- to unaccountable maneuvers of other drivers.  It would be OK if everyone drove safely to begin with, but they don't.  Technology has to anticipate the unknowable and be ready to respond.  That is Continue reading "Reality Sets In"

Transformational CSR: When a pro-bono client metamorphizes into a cultural change agent within an agency


This post is by Guest Contributor from Shonali Burke Consulting


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CSRGuest Post by Lisa Holtorf and Dawn Buzynski For most companies, Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) means giving back to the surrounding community. It’s typically done by supporting specific organizations either financially, through time and resources, or both. Companies choose to give because it’s the right thing to do, and it directly impacts the communities in which their employees live and work. For creative marketing agencies, CSR often takes the form of pro-bono services. Sometimes, that pro-bono relationship can help transform an agency’s culture. It did for Strategic America (SA). Ten years ago, our agency embarked on a journey that imprinted in our minds the impact we could make as strategic communicators and marketers. It began with a meeting where two women shared a story of profound loss, a story they wanted to turn into one of immeasurable hope. These women, along with three others, suffered the worst kind of loss—a
Lisa Holtorf
Continue reading "Transformational CSR: When a pro-bono client metamorphizes into a cultural change agent within an agency"

Smart PR


This post is by Jim Horton from Online Public Relations Thoughts


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This is smart PR.  Chipotle allowed a reporter to go behind the scenes and see how its restaurants operate day to day.  One of the highlights was cleanliness.  Chipotle has had several setbacks related to food contamination.  Its food handling procedure is now, perhaps, overdone to ensure its lettuce and other ingredients are free of microbes that can cause gastrointestinal illness.  The reporter's take on the process is upbeat and laudatory, and she follows it from start to finish at the serving line.  She highlights the company's precision in making dishes from just 51 ingredients in the building.  What Chipotle did by allowing a reporter in is not unusual, but more companies ought to be engaging the media this way.  It is great publicity as well as smart PR.

Still Don’t Get It?


This post is by Jim Horton from Online Public Relations Thoughts


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There is a question whether Google understands the nature of hate speech on its YouTube platform, even as the company says it is controlling it.  It is a reputational issue that surfaced again during testimony before Congress titled, "Hate Crimes and the Rise of White Nationalism."  Google live streamed the testimony before the House Judiciary Committee and unaccountably opened a live chat feed.  The chat feed was swiftly overrun with hate speech, anti-semitic jibes and slurs.  Google moved to cut it off but the damage was done.  The contention is that even a casual observer could have predicted the outcome.  Why couldn't Google?  Is it possible that Google's penchant for openness is working against it?  Or is the company afraid it will be accused of censorship?  Whatever the answer, it was clear that Google has yet to control hate speech on YouTube, Continue reading "Still Don’t Get It?"

Trapped


This post is by Jim Horton from Online Public Relations Thoughts


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One tenet of good management and employee relations is to listen to what subordinates have to suggest in getting work done.  But, few managers do it.  Why?  There are a number of reasons including arrogance, but this one seems to make the most sense.  Managers feel trapped between dictates from the top and pressure from below.  They don't listen to employees because they don't feel they have the power to make changes and emphasis on short-term results prevents experimentation.  The authors of the article performed extensive research to come to the conclusion.  So, employee relations can stress all it wants that managers need to listen but if the system is against it, it won't happen.  Change comes from the top and radiates through the ranks.  If the CEO is a micro-manager, managers won't listen to subordinates, but if the CEO gives Continue reading "Trapped"

SDF Podcast 27: When April Fool’s meets Groundhog Day


This post is by neville@nevillehobson.com (Neville Hobson) from Neville Hobson


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Brexit
So this is the episode when the three stooges of the SmallDataForum were meant to reflect wistfully on what was Great Britain exiting Greater Europe. The irony of recording this on April Fool’s Day wasn’t lost on us. Brexit Fool’s day is every day, these days. Our resident classicist Sam even managed to squeeze in Juvenal’s Satire VI, and even though the reference was in regard to another April Fool’s – Facebook regulation, haha – Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes might just as well mean “who regulates the regulators?” Ah – wouldn’t that be The Great British Electorate? Well, they have spoken, just over 1,000 days ago. And what they said, means what it means. Fool’s Day and any other day. After our recording, the Prime Minister finally reached out to the Leader of Her Majesty’s Opposition to figure out how to move forward. Or sideways. Or move at
Infinity
Cybersecurity
Thomas Stoeckle
Continue reading "SDF Podcast 27: When April Fool’s meets Groundhog Day"