PRoust Questionnaire: José Manuel Velasco


This post is by Judy Gombita from PR Conversations


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The PRoust Questionnaire provides a quick insight into a public relations practitioner’s interests and point of view, as well as her or his professional beliefs and values. If you are not familiar with the original 19th-century Proust Questionnaire, please see details at the end of this post.  

PRoust Questionnaire answers from José Manuel Velasco:

What is your most striking characteristic as a PR practitioner? Appreciating and understanding the context of an initiative or challenge, and then
delivering a proposal to answer key questions about managing the environment,
including anticipated emotional responses. What is your principal fault as a PR practitioner? I have many faults, but the thing that tests me the most is project management; I know what I need is more order and better procedures. What is your favourite occupation in PR? Probably because of my background in journalism (see the next answer), the thing I continue to
Continue reading "PRoust Questionnaire: José Manuel Velasco"

PRoust Questionnaire: José Manuel Velasco


This post is by Judy Gombita from PR Conversations


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The PRoust Questionnaire provides a quick insight into a public relations practitioner’s interests and point of view, as well as her or his professional beliefs and values. If you are not familiar with the original 19th-century Proust Questionnaire, please see details at the end of this post.  

PRoust Questionnaire answers from José Manuel Velasco:

What is your most striking characteristic as a PR practitioner? Appreciating and understanding the context of an initiative or challenge, and then
delivering a proposal to answer key questions about managing the environment,
including anticipated emotional responses. What is your principal fault as a PR practitioner? I have many faults, but the thing that tests me the most is project management; I know what I need is more order and better procedures. What is your favourite occupation in PR? Probably because of my background in journalism (see the next answer), the thing I continue to
Continue reading "PRoust Questionnaire: José Manuel Velasco"

Fit for the 21st and digital century: PR should abandon its managerial dreams and focus more on achieving its promises


This post is by Heather_Yaxley from PR Conversations


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Is it time for public relations practice to abandon its managerial dreams? Prompted by the previous PR Conversations post (Professional PR Development. Why bother?), Dr Ana Adi and Thomas Stoeckle consider the legacy of Grunig’s Model of Excellence and a need to adjust to a contemporary digital environment.

Ana Adi

With all the recent focus on the rapid technological changes, I have found myself confronted more often, both in my courses at Quadriga University of Applied Sciences and in my consultancy, with questions like:
“what should practitioners do” and “how does/will technology affect PR practice”.
Kevin Ruck and Heather Yaxley had pointed out in another conversation on PR Conversations how few practitioners (about 5% of the UK practitioners) are doing anything about their professional development, advocating for normalizing this behavior by promoting and adopting various learning models. And while I have found myself agreeing with Heather’s suggestion to encourage a
Continue reading "Fit for the 21st and digital century: PR should abandon its managerial dreams and focus more on achieving its promises"

Fit for the 21st and digital century: PR should abandon its managerial dreams and focus more on achieving its promises


This post is by Heather_Yaxley from PR Conversations


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Is it time for public relations practice to abandon its managerial dreams? Prompted by the previous PR Conversations post (Professional PR Development. Why bother?), Dr Ana Adi and Thomas Stoeckle consider the legacy of Grunig’s Model of Excellence and a need to adjust to a contemporary digital environment.

Ana Adi

With all the recent focus on the rapid technological changes, I have found myself confronted more often, both in my courses at Quadriga University of Applied Sciences and in my consultancy, with questions like:
“what should practitioners do” and “how does/will technology affect PR practice”.
Kevin Ruck and Heather Yaxley had pointed out in another conversation on PR Conversations how few practitioners (about 5% of the UK practitioners) are doing anything about their professional development, advocating for normalizing this behavior by promoting and adopting various learning models. And while I have found myself agreeing with Heather’s suggestion to encourage a
Continue reading "Fit for the 21st and digital century: PR should abandon its managerial dreams and focus more on achieving its promises"

Fit for the 21st and digital century: PR should abandon its managerial dreams and focus more on achieving its promises


This post is by Heather_Yaxley from PR Conversations


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Is it time for public relations practice to abandon its managerial dreams? Prompted by the previous PR Conversations post (Professional PR Development. Why bother?), Dr Ana Adi and Thomas Stoeckle consider the legacy of Grunig’s Model of Excellence and a need to adjust to a contemporary digital environment.

Ana Adi

With all the recent focus on the rapid technological changes, I have found myself confronted more often, both in my courses at Quadriga University of Applied Sciences and in my consultancy, with questions like:
“what should practitioners do” and “how does/will technology affect PR practice”.
Kevin Ruck and Heather Yaxley had pointed out in another conversation on PR Conversations how few practitioners (about 5% of the UK practitioners) are doing anything about their professional development, advocating for normalizing this behavior by promoting and adopting various learning models. And while I have found myself agreeing with Heather’s suggestion to encourage a
Continue reading "Fit for the 21st and digital century: PR should abandon its managerial dreams and focus more on achieving its promises"

Fit for the 21st and digital century: PR should abandon its managerial dreams and focus more on achieving its promises


This post is by Heather_Yaxley from PR Conversations


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Is it time for public relations practice to abandon its managerial dreams? Prompted by the previous PR Conversations post (Professional PR Development. Why bother?), Dr Ana Adi and Thomas Stoeckle consider the legacy of Grunig’s Model of Excellence and a need to adjust to a contemporary digital environment.

Ana Adi

With all the recent focus on the rapid technological changes, I have found myself confronted more often, both in my courses at Quadriga University of Applied Sciences and in my consultancy, with questions like:
“what should practitioners do” and “how does/will technology affect PR practice”.
Kevin Ruck and Heather Yaxley had pointed out in another conversation on PR Conversations how few practitioners (about 5% of the UK practitioners) are doing anything about their professional development, advocating for normalizing this behavior by promoting and adopting various learning models. And while I have found myself agreeing with Heather’s suggestion to encourage a
Continue reading "Fit for the 21st and digital century: PR should abandon its managerial dreams and focus more on achieving its promises"

Fit for the 21st and digital century: PR should abandon its managerial dreams and focus more on achieving its promises


This post is by Heather_Yaxley from PR Conversations


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Is it time for public relations practice to abandon its managerial dreams? Prompted by the previous PR Conversations post (Professional PR Development. Why bother?), Dr Ana Adi and Thomas Stoeckle consider the legacy of Grunig’s Model of Excellence and a need to adjust to a contemporary digital environment.

Ana Adi

With all the recent focus on the rapid technological changes, I have found myself confronted more often, both in my courses at Quadriga University of Applied Sciences and in my consultancy, with questions like:
“what should practitioners do” and “how does/will technology affect PR practice”.
Kevin Ruck and Heather Yaxley had pointed out in another conversation on PR Conversations how few practitioners (about 5% of the UK practitioners) are doing anything about their professional development, advocating for normalizing this behavior by promoting and adopting various learning models. And while I have found myself agreeing with Heather’s suggestion to encourage a
Continue reading "Fit for the 21st and digital century: PR should abandon its managerial dreams and focus more on achieving its promises"

Professional PR Development. Why bother?


This post is by Heather_Yaxley from PR Conversations


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Professional PR Development. Why bother? Let’s talk about professional PR development. Why bother? That’s the question that started the following PR conversation between Kevin Ruck and Heather Yaxley. If you have views on this topic, then add a comment here or on social media.

Kevin RuckDr Kevin Ruck
Co-founder, PR Academy
With PR bodies increasingly focused on the importance of raising standards in professionalism and ethics, why are some (or most?) practitioners not that bothered about career development? I have seen a senior practitioner almost brag that he didn’t have time to read books about practice. I have heard others vehemently dismiss learning about theory as a waste of time – arguing that practitioners should just focus on the ‘real’ world. I have seen people openly state that they have no qualifications but lots of experience, where having ‘no qualifications’ almost becomes a badge of honour. I see agencies offering communication research and audit services
Heather Yaxley
Continue reading "Professional PR Development. Why bother?"

Professional PR Development. Why bother?


This post is by Heather_Yaxley from PR Conversations


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Professional PR Development. Why bother? Let’s talk about professional PR development. Why bother? That’s the question that started the following PR conversation between Kevin Ruck and Heather Yaxley. If you have views on this topic, then add a comment here or on social media.

Kevin RuckDr Kevin Ruck
Co-founder, PR Academy
With PR bodies increasingly focused on the importance of raising standards in professionalism and ethics, why are some (or most?) practitioners not that bothered about career development? I have seen a senior practitioner almost brag that he didn’t have time to read books about practice. I have heard others vehemently dismiss learning about theory as a waste of time – arguing that practitioners should just focus on the ‘real’ world. I have seen people openly state that they have no qualifications but lots of experience, where having ‘no qualifications’ almost becomes a badge of honour. I see agencies offering communication research and audit services
Heather Yaxley
Continue reading "Professional PR Development. Why bother?"

Professional PR Development. Why bother?


This post is by Heather_Yaxley from PR Conversations


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Professional PR Development. Why bother? Let’s talk about professional PR development. Why bother? That’s the question that started the following PR conversation between Kevin Ruck and Heather Yaxley. If you have views on this topic, then add a comment here or on social media.

Kevin RuckDr Kevin Ruck
Co-founder, PR Academy
With PR bodies increasingly focused on the importance of raising standards in professionalism and ethics, why are some (or most?) practitioners not that bothered about career development? I have seen a senior practitioner almost brag that he didn’t have time to read books about practice. I have heard others vehemently dismiss learning about theory as a waste of time – arguing that practitioners should just focus on the ‘real’ world. I have seen people openly state that they have no qualifications but lots of experience, where having ‘no qualifications’ almost becomes a badge of honour. I see agencies offering communication research and audit services
Heather Yaxley
Continue reading "Professional PR Development. Why bother?"

Professional PR Development. Why bother?


This post is by Heather_Yaxley from PR Conversations


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Professional PR Development. Why bother? Let’s talk about professional PR development. Why bother? That’s the question that started the following PR conversation between Kevin Ruck and Heather Yaxley. If you have views on this topic, then add a comment here or on social media.

Kevin RuckDr Kevin Ruck
Co-founder, PR Academy
With PR bodies increasingly focused on the importance of raising standards in professionalism and ethics, why are some (or most?) practitioners not that bothered about career development? I have seen a senior practitioner almost brag that he didn’t have time to read books about practice. I have heard others vehemently dismiss learning about theory as a waste of time – arguing that practitioners should just focus on the ‘real’ world. I have seen people openly state that they have no qualifications but lots of experience, where having ‘no qualifications’ almost becomes a badge of honour. I see agencies offering communication research and audit services
Heather Yaxley
Continue reading "Professional PR Development. Why bother?"

Professional PR Development. Why bother?


This post is by Heather_Yaxley from PR Conversations


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Let’s talk about professional PR development. Why bother? That’s the question that started the following PR conversation between Kevin Ruck and Heather Yaxley. If you have views on this topic, then add a comment here or on social media.

Kevin RuckDr Kevin Ruck
Co-founder, PR Academy
With PR bodies increasingly focused on the importance of raising standards in professionalism and ethics, why are some (or most?) practitioners not that bothered about career development? I have seen a senior practitioner almost brag that he didn’t have time to read books about practice. I have heard others vehemently dismiss learning about theory as a waste of time – arguing that practitioners should just focus on the ‘real’ world. I have seen people openly state that they have no qualifications but lots of experience, where having ‘no qualifications’ almost becomes a badge of honour. I see agencies offering communication research and audit services
Heather Yaxley
Continue reading "Professional PR Development. Why bother?"

Practical perspective of PR management


This post is by Heather_Yaxley from PR Conversations


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The 2017 European Communications Monitor report has been published recently detailing challenges facing strategic communicators in 50 countries. In this guest post, Anastasiya Shyrina, provides her perspective on the practicalities of PR management in Ukraine. My friends know that I work in public relations. What they frequently don’t know is what exactly I do every day. Looking back at my 5-year career full of diverse hands-on experience, I came up with a list of 15 typical tasks which pay my bills. Ironically, PR as a sphere has certain reputational problems itself. For instance, many people believe PR is only about socializing, being “likable” and wearing nice clothes. In my experience, employees from Communications department spend their lives performing the following functions: 1. Copywriting Public relations professional strives to create a positive reputation for his/her client with the help of information materials. He/she is behind organization’s press releases, feature articles, blog
Continue reading "Practical perspective of PR management"

Practical perspective of PR management


This post is by Heather_Yaxley from PR Conversations


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The 2017 European Communications Monitor report has been published recently detailing challenges facing strategic communicators in 50 countries. In this guest post, Anastasiya Shyrina, provides her perspective on the practicalities of PR management in Ukraine. My friends know that I work in public relations. What they frequently don’t know is what exactly I do every day. Looking back at my 5-year career full of diverse hands-on experience, I came up with a list of 15 typical tasks which pay my bills. Ironically, PR as a sphere has certain reputational problems itself. For instance, many people believe PR is only about socializing, being “likable” and wearing nice clothes. In my experience, employees from Communications department spend their lives performing the following functions: 1. Copywriting Public relations professional strives to create a positive reputation for his/her client with the help of information materials. He/she is behind organization’s press releases, feature articles, blog
Continue reading "Practical perspective of PR management"

Practical perspective of PR management


This post is by Heather_Yaxley from PR Conversations


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The 2017 European Communications Monitor report has been published recently detailing challenges facing strategic communicators in 50 countries. In this guest post, Anastasiya Shyrina, provides her perspective on the practicalities of PR management in Ukraine. My friends know that I work in public relations. What they frequently don’t know is what exactly I do every day. Looking back at my 5-year career full of diverse hands-on experience, I came up with a list of 15 typical tasks which pay my bills. Ironically, PR as a sphere has certain reputational problems itself. For instance, many people believe PR is only about socializing, being “likable” and wearing nice clothes. In my experience, employees from Communications department spend their lives performing the following functions: 1. Copywriting Public relations professional strives to create a positive reputation for his/her client with the help of information materials. He/she is behind organization’s press releases, feature articles, blog
Continue reading "Practical perspective of PR management"

PRoust Questionnaire: Kim Blanchette


This post is by Judy Gombita from PR Conversations


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The PRoust Questionnaire provides a quick insight into a public relations practitioner’s interests and point of view, as well as her or his professional beliefs and values. If you are not familiar with the original 19th-century Proust Questionnaire, please see details at the end of this post.

PRoust Questionnaire answers from Kim Blanchette:

What is your most striking characteristic as a PR practitioner? Can I have two? When under pressure, I can jump to tactics. I recognize this is wrong, but sometimes I move into “get it done” mode. (I try to remind myself to step out and look at the bigger picture.) However, on more than one occasion, I’ve been told my very loud laugh is quite distinctive. What is your principal fault as a PR practitioner? Can I have two? When under pressure, I can jump to tactics. I recognize this is wrong, but sometimes move into
Continue reading "PRoust Questionnaire: Kim Blanchette"

PRoust Questionnaire: Kim Blanchette


This post is by from PR Conversations


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The PRoust Questionnaire provides a quick insight into a public relations practitioner’s interests and point of view, as well as her or his professional beliefs and values. If you are not familiar with the original 19th-century Proust Questionnaire, please see details at the end of this post.

PRoust Questionnaire answers from Kim Blanchette:

What is your most striking characteristic as a PR practitioner? Can I have two? When under pressure, I can jump to tactics. I recognize this is wrong, but sometimes I move into “get it done” mode. (I try to remind myself to step out and look at the bigger picture.) However, on more than one occasion, I’ve been told my very loud laugh is quite distinctive. What is your principal fault as a PR practitioner? Can I have two? When under pressure, I can jump to tactics. I recognize this is wrong, but sometimes move into
Continue reading "PRoust Questionnaire: Kim Blanchette"

PRoust Questionnaire: Kim Blanchette


This post is by from PR Conversations


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The PRoust Questionnaire provides a quick insight into a public relations practitioner’s interests and point of view, as well as her or his professional beliefs and values. If you are not familiar with the original 19th-century Proust Questionnaire, please see details at the end of this post.

PRoust Questionnaire answers from Kim Blanchette:

What is your most striking characteristic as a PR practitioner? Can I have two? When under pressure, I can jump to tactics. I recognize this is wrong, but sometimes I move into “get it done” mode. (I try to remind myself to step out and look at the bigger picture.) However, on more than one occasion, I’ve been told my very loud laugh is quite distinctive. What is your principal fault as a PR practitioner? Can I have two? When under pressure, I can jump to tactics. I recognize this is wrong, but sometimes move into
Continue reading "PRoust Questionnaire: Kim Blanchette"

PRoust Questionnaire: Kim Blanchette


This post is by Judy Gombita from PR Conversations


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The PRoust Questionnaire provides a quick insight into a public relations practitioner’s interests and point of view, as well as her or his professional beliefs and values. If you are not familiar with the original 19th-century Proust Questionnaire, please see details at the end of this post.

PRoust Questionnaire answers from Kim Blanchette:

What is your most striking characteristic as a PR practitioner? Can I have two? When under pressure, I can jump to tactics. I recognize this is wrong, but sometimes I move into “get it done” mode. (I try to remind myself to step out and look at the bigger picture.) However, on more than one occasion, I’ve been told my very loud laugh is quite distinctive. What is your principal fault as a PR practitioner? Can I have two? When under pressure, I can jump to tactics. I recognize this is wrong, but sometimes move into
Continue reading "PRoust Questionnaire: Kim Blanchette"

PRoust Questionnaire: Kim Blanchette


This post is by from PR Conversations


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The PRoust Questionnaire provides a quick insight into a public relations practitioner’s interests and point of view, as well as her or his professional beliefs and values. If you are not familiar with the original 19th-century Proust Questionnaire, please see details at the end of this post.

PRoust Questionnaire answers from Kim Blanchette:

What is your most striking characteristic as a PR practitioner? Can I have two? When under pressure, I can jump to tactics. I recognize this is wrong, but sometimes I move into “get it done” mode. (I try to remind myself to step out and look at the bigger picture.) However, on more than one occasion, I’ve been told my very loud laugh is quite distinctive. What is your principal fault as a PR practitioner? Can I have two? When under pressure, I can jump to tactics. I recognize this is wrong, but sometimes move into
Continue reading "PRoust Questionnaire: Kim Blanchette"