The clock is ticking

Check out this fascinating Advertising Age interview of Facebook marketing guru Andrew Keller. While Keller expounds on any number of topics in the piece, he hones in specifically on the rise of the term “six seconds” in advertising. While the Facebook executive, and his fellow advertisers, are fixated on six seconds, research shows the average human actually has an attention span of eight whole seconds. That’s one second less than a goldfish. But, the six (or eight) second discussion should extend far beyond Keller’s focus on digital advertising and videos. Split second responses are table stakes in ALL forms of communications today. In the new normal of Trump Tweets, fake news and Kevin Spacey/Harvey Weinstein-type transgressions, individuals and organizations have about eight seconds to gather their thoughts and determine:

Social media stars breaching rules on promoting brands, watchdog says

NevilleHobson.com
Social media stars breaching rules on promoting brands, watchdog says
songofstyle Instagram The Guardian reports on a rise in complaints to the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA), the UK advertising regulator, who says ‘influencers’ on social media sites such as Instagram and Twitter fail to declare that they are being paid to publicise products. The newspaper defines ‘influencers’ thus:
Social media celebrities who have large and engaged followings online. They get paid money to publicise products and can command tens of thousands for one post.
This is about disclosure where the influencer publicising a product or service would makes it clear in his or her post that there’s some kind of relationship with the brand owner and/or that the influencer receives compensation for that post, financial or otherwise. It’s common sense to disclose such relationships, to ensure there’s no ambiguity and to improve transparency. In our current climate of fake news
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Perspectives on blogging in the UK

NevilleHobson.com
Perspectives on blogging in the UK
Blogging Blogging for business and pleasure is alive and flourishing in the UK, according to the second annual survey of UK bloggers carried out by Vuelio UK in conjunction with Canterbury Christ Church University. The survey was conducted in February 2017 to explore how bloggers work, their activities and views about their relationship with PR professionals and the future commercialisation of their work. Published last week, the results present a useful snapshot of the UK blogosphere. Whether you’re a blogger or someone wanting to understand and connect with bloggers, there’s much of interest in the report. Ten highlights:
  1. Although a majority (34%) of survey respondents said they blog for personal reasons, there is continuing growth in professional blogging with more interest and activity in developing a blog commercially.
  2. For 12% of survey respondents, blogging professionally is their main source of income –
    Blog disclosure
    Relationship with PRs
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How to get the media on board to end AVE

NHC
How to get the media on board to end AVE
Fearless Girl One of the hurdles along the road of seeing an end to the “advertising value equivalence” (AVE) measurement metric that’s decried by many in the PR and measurement communities is persuading organisations to stop using it. The issue with AVE is well summarised in a white paper published by The Institute for Public Relations in 2003, in which this succinct text appears:
We urge you to move away as quickly as possible from statements of the nature, “Our news coverage this quarter was worth $X million in advertising.” Instead, talk about how you achieved your prominence goal, how your coverage gained in prominence over the year, or how you beat out your competitors in terms of the prominence of your coverage.
Calls to action within the PR community to stop using AVE can only go so far –
Fearless Girl AVE / Bloomberg Businessweek
AdWeek
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Is podcasting about to get its tipping point?

NHC
Is podcasting about to get its tipping point?
Podcasts There’s been quite a sense of anticipation, if not excitement, among podcasters about Apple’s announcement last week on some significant enhancements the company is making this autumn to its podcast app for iPhones and other iOS devices. The big change in the app is potentially a game-changer for podcasting as it will provide podcasters with basic analytics functionality to offer evidence of listening behaviours by subscribers (where they paused in a podcast, how much of it they listened to, did they listen to all of it, etc) rather than just metrics on downloads (how many downloads, which country are downloaders in, what directory listing did they click, etc). In simple terms, it means podcasters will now be able to answer the question “How many listens does your podcast get?” with some confidence that will fill a major gap in understanding
iTunes Podcast Directory
Listen on Apple Podcasts
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The end of AVE in PR?

NevilleHobson.com
The end of AVE in PR?
RIP AVE If there’s one phrase guaranteed to generate debate in the PR business, it’s ‘advertising value equivalence,’ AVE for short. In simple terms, AVE looks at the volume of space an editorial article takes in a print publication, or the amount of time an editorial audio or video segment plays, and equates its value to the price you’d have paid if you had bought the equivalent-size space or time as advertising. For decades the use of AVE has been a controversial activity, one that has been viewed as unethical by some practitioners and professional associations regarding its perceived lack of validity as a metric to measure the value of a public relations activity. You can read this argument in considerable detail in a paper published by The Institute for Public Relations. In particular, note this discussion point from the paper:
We urge you
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