The Data Science Behind the Dating Scene

Today’s guest blog was authored by Jason Baik of Peppercomm… Most people associate “analytics” with simple tables and graphs without really understanding the true power of data. I’m here to break that stereotype. Before I get into the details, a bit of background is required. My name is Jason, a professional analyst and a true data advocate; I analyze everything from conducting non-hierarchical clustering for my fantasy football drafting to predictive price modeling for my bitcoin gambling. You name it and I probably have a personal spreadsheet of it. When I was freshly single in the summer of 2016, I decided to follow in the footsteps of journalist Amy Webb and put my love of analytics behind my pursuit of love: data behind my dating life. I started by crafting profiles across various dating apps and meticulously tracked everything, from opening lines and response times to respondent ethnicities and hobbies. I
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Why Corporate Leaders Must Join the National Conversation

Today’s guest blog was authored by Lauren Parker of Peppercomm… “Where is the corporate Kapernick?” Ariel Investments CEO Melody Hobson posed this question to a room full of CEOs during her presentation about diversity and inclusion in the board room. It’s one example reflective of our evolving cultural landscape and the impact it’s having on corporate America. Politics divide Americans on issues from gun control to tax reform. Women are standing up against systemic misogyny. The topic of racial inequality has moved out of the shadows and onto our national football fields. Every morning, we awake to new headlines that amplify these important national conversations. Technology has changed the way we consume and amplify news and opinion. It’s given people the opportunity to shout their points of view and it’s led to the expectation that everyone should have an opinion to share – including corporate leaders. Social media has
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For Immediate Release 113: Not a 280-Character Episode

NevilleHobson.com
For Immediate Release 113: Not a 280-Character Episode
appiiscreens Shel and I recorded the November edition of the monthly Hobson & Holtz Report podcast. We had a great chinwag on these topics:
  • A follow-up to our KFC story (about 11 herbs and spices); the social media team struck again.
  • Twitter has made its new expanded 280 character count available to almost everyone. Not everyone is happy about it.
  • Uber’s new CEO took an investigator’s advice and scrapped the company’s old values statements. Instead of simply crafting a new one, he crowdsourced it to his employees, who responded in a big way.
  • The traditional media thinks the fake news problem is elevating trust in the traditional media. Audiences don’t agree.
  • When pregnant US mums get information from a website with social media elements, they’re more likely to get their children vaccinated and keep those vaccinations up to date. There are
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Twitter offers richer scope with 280 characters

NevilleHobson.com
Twitter offers richer scope with 280 characters
Twitter Since Twitter first appeared in 2006, the notion of sharing your thoughts and those of others in a concise 140-character message you can create and share from myriad devices has become an enduring aspect of the social web. Today for many, it’s an essential communication tool that enables direct and unfiltered connection between individuals that results in engagement and even relationships. For others, it’s seen as a marketing channel that pays only lip service to authenticity. And for others still, it’s a dark place filled with fake news, misinformation and propaganda. One thing many of its roughly 100 million global daily active users might agree about is that Twitter can be a challenge to get a message across in only 140 characters. It often requires some smart thinking about words, grammar and meaning, requiring clever editing to get all you want
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The clock is ticking

Check out this fascinating Advertising Age interview of Facebook marketing guru Andrew Keller. While Keller expounds on any number of topics in the piece, he hones in specifically on the rise of the term “six seconds” in advertising. While the Facebook executive, and his fellow advertisers, are fixated on six seconds, research shows the average human actually has an attention span of eight whole seconds. That’s one second less than a goldfish. But, the six (or eight) second discussion should extend far beyond Keller’s focus on digital advertising and videos. Split second responses are table stakes in ALL forms of communications today. In the new normal of Trump Tweets, fake news and Kevin Spacey/Harvey Weinstein-type transgressions, individuals and organizations have about eight seconds to gather their thoughts and determine:

SDF Podcast 13: 1984 meets Pavlov’s dogs

NevilleHobson.com
SDF Podcast 13: 1984 meets Pavlov’s dogs
Trust “Trust, but verify” is a phrase that was used often by Ronald Reagan. It is more than a little ironic that this is originally a Russian proverb (Doveryai, no proveryai). Trust is also what links the various topics in episode 13 of our podcast (with show notes written by Thomas Stoeckle). From Chinese citizen scores to alleged irregularities in the UK referendum and the US presidential election, the implications of GDPR and the prospects of blockchain: trust is the glue that should hold together the fabric of such interactions, in private as well as public contexts.

China scores its citizens

Writer and academic Rachel Botsman calls her analysis of our hyperconnected, hyperpartisan times Who Can You Trust. Both Neville and I are currently reading the book, and it will feature in our next podcast (by which time I
1984
Full - Empty
Thomas Stoeckle
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Talk about a wunderkind

Note to readers: This is the second in a series of three blogs reviewing Harold Burson’s new book, “The Business of Persuasion” (available through Rosetta Books)….

But, after reading what Burson-Marsteller Founder Harold Burson had achieved at the same age, I must say I was beyond humbled (a unique experience to be sure). Consider the following (taken directly from his autobiography):
  •  He became a stringer for the Memphis Commercial Appeal as a sophomore in high school.
  •  He filed reports on University of Mississippi football for the Commercial Appeal while a college sophomore.
  •  While still in college, he provided public relations counsel to D.H. Ferguson, which was helping to build the atomic bomb.
  •  After WW II began, he filed nightly written reports for all U.S. officers serving in Europe.
  •  At the age of 24, he covered the Nuremberg trials for the American News Network.
His accomplishments are mind-numbing to
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