CEO Activism: What We Have Learned So Far in 2017

I wanted to share this piece I wrote for Harvard Business Review on what we have learned about CEO and corporate activism so far. We’ve been consistently monitoring the dynamic of CEOs speaking out on some of the hot button issues of the day. In addition to the market research we have done, we analyzed corporate and CEO responses to each of the contentious issues in 2017, whether it was the travel ban, climate change withdrawal, Charlottesville, etc. It is important for companies to understand the patterns in how companies are responding in order to determine if they want to walk that tightrope or not. Here it is. Enjoy. The post CEO Activism: What We Have Learned So Far in 2017 appeared first on ReputationXchange.

CEO Activism in Millennials’ Eyes

As you know if you follow me, I am particularly intrigued by this newest strain of CEO visibility and engagement which has emerged and is rapidly evolving – CEO activism. We at Weber Shandwick along with KRC Research have been examining this phenomenon for some time now and producing original research on the topic. We just released our second survey among 1,021 Americans on their opinions on CEO activism which are especially interesting since they provide new insights on the Millennial generation. The newest survey demonstrates that overall sentiment about CEO activism has not changed much since we did our earlier survey one year ago. BUT Millennials, the most coveted demographic segment by employers and companies looking to sell more products/services are the generation that are most in favor of CEOs being proactive on hot-button societal issues. In size, Millennials have now surpassed Boomers so I’d say that their opinions Continue reading "CEO Activism in Millennials’ Eyes"

CEO Activism in Millennials’ Eyes

As you know if you follow me, I am particularly intrigued by this newest strain of CEO visibility and engagement which has emerged and is rapidly evolving – CEO activism. We at Weber Shandwick along with KRC Research have been examining this phenomenon for some time now and producing original research on the topic. We just released our second survey among 1,021 Americans on their opinions on CEO activism which are especially interesting since they provide new insights on the Millennial generation. The newest survey demonstrates that overall sentiment about CEO activism has not changed much since we did our earlier survey one year ago. BUT Millennials, the most coveted demographic segment by employers and companies looking to sell more products/services are the generation that are most in favor of CEOs being proactive on hot-button societal issues. In size, Millennials have now surpassed Boomers so I’d say that their opinions Continue reading "CEO Activism in Millennials’ Eyes"

CEO Activism in Millennials’ Eyes

As you know if you follow me, I am particularly intrigued by this newest strain of CEO visibility and engagement which has emerged and is rapidly evolving – CEO activism. We at Weber Shandwick along with KRC Research have been examining this phenomenon for some time now and producing original research on the topic. We just released our second survey among 1,021 Americans on their opinions on CEO activism which are especially interesting since they provide new insights on the Millennial generation. The newest survey demonstrates that overall sentiment about CEO activism has not changed much since we did our earlier survey one year ago. BUT Millennials, the most coveted demographic segment by employers and companies looking to sell more products/services are the generation that are most in favor of CEOs being proactive on hot-button societal issues. In size, Millennials have now surpassed Boomers so I’d say that their opinions Continue reading "CEO Activism in Millennials’ Eyes"

Nameless faceless CEOs

The headline was America’s Invisible Bosses and naturally I was curious. The research by APPrise Mobile found that nearly one quarter (23%) of Americans who work in companies with over 500 employees (midsized) were not sure whether they could name their CEO. This was more common among employees under 24 years old (not a surprise). I guess what did surprise me was this was not what I would call a case for “invisible bosses.” As I see this, the research says that nearly 3 in 4 employed Americans (77%) know their CEO’s name. That’s actually a pretty high number and certainly tips more on the “visible” side of the scale for me. CEOs are not as nameless as one might suspect. APPrise included a great question in the survey. They asked whether employees could identify their CEO from a lineup. That made me laugh. Just imagine a line up Continue reading "Nameless faceless CEOs"

What makes a high-performing CEO?

You ought to read this article on what makes some CEOs successful and others not. There are lots of interesting things to learn from their 10 year old research study called the CEO Genome Project.  The researchers were able to identify what makes a high performing CEO relative to a less successful one from a wide swath of business leaders.  They examined 17,000 C-suite leaders including 2,000 CEOs in all major industry sectors and sizes. The authors are at ghSmart and partnered with economists at the University of Chicago and Copenhagen Business School along with analysts at SAS Inc. Here are some of the findings that stood out for me:
  • Boards like to hire extrovert CEOs but introvert CEOs tend to be better performers.
  • Almost every CEO made material mistakes in their careers and 45% had at least one major career blowup. Learning from failure is important to Continue reading "What makes a high-performing CEO?"

Reputation Tidbits

Gosh, it’s been a while since I posted. It’s been a nonstop quarter and I feel like I can breathe this weekend. So I thought I’d mention a few things that have been on my radar reputation-wise. First, Harris Poll RQ released their 2017 corporate reputation study that included some interesting metrics. First, they find that crisis in one company does not necessarily infect other companies in the same industry. Thus, a company that has lost reputational standing in the financial services industry does not necessarily transfer its problems to other industry peers. That’s good news. The Harris Poll analysts also revealed that some companies are more liked (have higher RQs) by Republicans than Democrats. The polarization that exists today carries itself into reputational favorability among the public. This is notable because more CEOs are making their positions known on hot-button societal issues. So it makes sense for CEOs to
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