Opinion piece on the demise of Bell Pottinger

As Bell Pottinger prepares to put itself into administration, resulting in hundreds of job losses, following its expulsion from the Public Relations and Communications Association (PRCA), here’s an opinion piece, which calls out the PRCA’s humbug.

PRCA betrayed the PR trade by witch hunting Bell Pottinger

The PRCA has willfully destroyed a great British PR brand, and then boasted about it in the public domain. Shame on them. Bell Pottinger (BP) was working for the controversial Gupta family as a cover for working for Zuma and the ANC. BP’s work for the Guptas was, it seems, done in the dark by anonymous agents in social media. Sometimes, those agents were fake. Moreover on behalf of the Guptas, BP launched attacks in SA on people and firms who were existing clients of BP. Promulgating PR messages in the dark for clients who are proxies for political parties or corrupt individuals and Continue reading "Opinion piece on the demise of Bell Pottinger"

Bell Pottinger South Africa, a reality check

What unites all the major political parties in South Africa: the African National Congress (ANC), the Democratic Alliance (DA), the South African Communist Party (SACP) and the Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF)? The answer is their determination to divide the country along pre-existing racial fault lines. Yet the DA, South Africa’s main opposition party, has had the audacity to lodge a misconduct claim against Bell Pottinger (BP) with the UK’s Public Relations Consultants Association, accusing it, among other things, of “sow[ing] racial mistrust, hate and race-baiting, and [encouraging a] divided society”.  So, in essence, BP is being accused by the DA of packaging DA-style politics for a rival stakeholder in South Africa; namely Oakbay Resources and Energy, owned by the controversial Gupta family, close associates of President Jacob Zuma. Yet such has been the howl of protest in the Western and South African media that Bell Pottinger has issued an Continue reading "Bell Pottinger South Africa, a reality check"

Maximising resilience of health and well-being assets in crisis situations

A comment left by New Zealand PR consultant, Catherine Arrow, on a recent post on my personal Greenbanana blog indicated that the topic (the language of grief and a biopsychosocial perspective on mental health issues) was worthy of further investigation. The following is the result of our subsequent shared musings concerning the impact of crisis situations on the health and well-being of public relations practitioners. If you have any thoughts on this topic, we invite you to continue our conversation in the comments. Heather:  Catherine, you mentioned that communicators working to help others during and after natural disasters in recent years in New Zealand may be suffering the same effects as the people they are trying to assist, yet have to suppress their emotions, seemingly indefinitely, in order to get the job done. How do you feel that practitioners, employers, professional bodies and academics can address this concern? Catherine: We
Continue reading "Maximising resilience of health and well-being assets in crisis situations"

Maximising resilience of health and well-being assets in crisis situations

A comment left by New Zealand PR consultant, Catherine Arrow, on a recent post on my personal Greenbanana blog indicated that the topic (the language of grief and a biopsychosocial perspective on mental health issues) was worthy of further investigation. The following is the result of our subsequent shared musings concerning the impact of crisis situations on the health and well-being of public relations practitioners. If you have any thoughts on this topic, we invite you to continue our conversation in the comments. Heather Yaxley:  Catherine, you mentioned that communicators working to help others during and after natural disasters in recent years in New Zealand may be suffering the same effects as the people they are trying to assist, yet have to suppress their emotions, seemingly indefinitely, in order to get the job done. How do you feel that practitioners, employers, professional bodies and academics can address this concern? Catherine
Continue reading "Maximising resilience of health and well-being assets in crisis situations"

Reputation Tidbits

Gosh, it’s been a while since I posted. It’s been a nonstop quarter and I feel like I can breathe this weekend. So I thought I’d mention a few things that have been on my radar reputation-wise. First, Harris Poll RQ released their 2017 corporate reputation study that included some interesting metrics. First, they find that crisis in one company does not necessarily infect other companies in the same industry. Thus, a company that has lost reputational standing in the financial services industry does not necessarily transfer its problems to other industry peers. That’s good news. The Harris Poll analysts also revealed that some companies are more liked (have higher RQs) by Republicans than Democrats. The polarization that exists today carries itself into reputational favorability among the public. This is notable because more CEOs are making their positions known on hot-button societal issues. So it makes sense for CEOs to
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CEO activism plusses and minuses

Here are three recent pieces reflecting on CEO activism since the president’s executive order on immigration. One I wrote for HBR and the other two are full of compelling arguments about whether CEOs should speak up or not, should be on the president’s advisory council or not. And ultimately, the cost of CEOs remaining silent or neutral. I can safely predict that this new surge in CEO activism will continue. HBR: https://hbr.org/2017/02/what-ceos-should-know-about-speaking-up-on-political-issues Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/on-leadership/wp/2017/02/17/the-cost-of-silence-why-more-ceos-are-speaking-out-in-the-trump-era/?utm_term=.cd3c87afba11&wpisrc=nl_heads-draw6&wpmm=1 New York Times: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/16/business/trump-ceo-invitations.html?_r=0 The post CEO activism plusses and minuses appeared first on ReputationXchange.

CEO Bad Behavior

I have been derelict with my blog so the guilt is driving me to spend some time today to post about a fascinating research analysis of when CEOs engage in questionable behavior and how the board responds to these reputation-damaging missteps. In an article by professors David Larcker and Brian Tayan at Stanford Graduate School of Business, entitled “Scoundrels in the C-Suite,” a nice provocative title, they question what happens to CEO who misbehave. And for a very good reason which is that misbehavior at the top influences behavior below and spreads exponentially. Time and time again, we hear about CEOs creating a tone at the top that impacts how the organization and allowed misconduct to be condoned. Since the authors realize that you can only measure what you can see, they looked at media reports of CEO misbehavior to determine how the board reacted and what type of retribution was doled out to the offender. Thus, Larcker Continue reading "CEO Bad Behavior"