SDF Podcast 20: GDPR, ePrivacy, copyright and antitrust: the EU’s long game

Show notes for this episode written by Thomas Stoeckle. “If a tree falls in a forest, and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?” A modern version of this 18th century thought experiment by the philosopher and cleric George Berkeley might read: “If the EU fines a big tech firm billions of dollars, and no one has the power to enforce it, has it actually happened?” A recent opinion piece on AdExchanger discussed the connection between Google’s $5bn antitrust fine, and the enforcement of fines for GDPR non-compliance. Europe is committed to taking a stand against corporations when it comes to privacy rights of consumers, intellectual property rights of content producers (although the planned law is controversial), and anti-competitive market positions. But there is potential tension between the goal of harmonizing privacy law across EU member states, and implementation and
Thomas Stoeckle
Continue reading "SDF Podcast 20: GDPR, ePrivacy, copyright and antitrust: the EU’s long game"

PRoust Questionnaire: José Manuel Velasco

The PRoust Questionnaire provides a quick insight into a public relations practitioner’s interests and point of view, as well as her or his professional beliefs and values. If you are not familiar with the original 19th-century Proust Questionnaire, please see details at the end of this post.  

PRoust Questionnaire answers from José Manuel Velasco:

What is your most striking characteristic as a PR practitioner? Appreciating and understanding the context of an initiative or challenge, and then
delivering a proposal to answer key questions about managing the environment,
including anticipated emotional responses. What is your principal fault as a PR practitioner? I have many faults, but the thing that tests me the most is project management; I know what I need is more order and better procedures. What is your favourite occupation in PR? Probably because of my background in journalism (see the next answer), the thing I continue to
Continue reading "PRoust Questionnaire: José Manuel Velasco"

PRoust Questionnaire: José Manuel Velasco

The PRoust Questionnaire provides a quick insight into a public relations practitioner’s interests and point of view, as well as her or his professional beliefs and values. If you are not familiar with the original 19th-century Proust Questionnaire, please see details at the end of this post.  

PRoust Questionnaire answers from José Manuel Velasco:

What is your most striking characteristic as a PR practitioner? Appreciating and understanding the context of an initiative or challenge, and then
delivering a proposal to answer key questions about managing the environment,
including anticipated emotional responses. What is your principal fault as a PR practitioner? I have many faults, but the thing that tests me the most is project management; I know what I need is more order and better procedures. What is your favourite occupation in PR? Probably because of my background in journalism (see the next answer), the thing I continue to
Continue reading "PRoust Questionnaire: José Manuel Velasco"

For Immediate Release 134: We start with Starbucks and end with drones

In this April edition of The Hobson & Holtz Report, Neville and Shel talk about…
  • Starbucks’ response to a racial incident in Philadelphia that went viral and sparked protests
  • In an effort to reduce “noise pollution,” Ghana wants Muslims to issue the call to prayer via WhatsApp
  • The line between earned and paid media is blurring and consumers don’t care which is which
  • There’s a reckoning coming for terms and conditions
  • Augmented Reality is making huge inroads (except in corporate communications)
  • Journalists in developing countries are using drones and sensors to cover environmental crimes and pollution
In his Tech Report, Dan York reports on what he found when he downloaded his Facebook data, Jordan Peel’s deepfake PSA from Barack Obama, why Chrome’s article recommendation feature could drive huge traffic to publishers, Flickr has been acquired by SmugMug (which plans to revitalize the photo service), and Mozilla has issued a call
Continue reading "For Immediate Release 134: We start with Starbucks and end with drones"

Social Web Recap 23.04.18

(My weekly annotated short summary of significant social web platform developments from the previous week, with links and carping marginalia as needed . . . Posted every Monday morning or thereabouts. )
          <img class="thumb-image" alt="Screen Shot 2018-04-17 at 10.49.07 AM.png" data-image="https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/t/5ad609be758d4681c2ff1e8e/1523976649482/Screen+Shot+2018-04-17+at+10.49.07+AM.png" data-image-dimensions="798x449" data-image-focal-point="0.5,0.5" data-load="false" data-image-id="5ad609be758d4681c2ff1e8e" data-type="image" src="https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/t/5ad609be758d4681c2ff1e8e/1523976649482/Screen+Shot+2018-04-17+at+10.49.07+AM.png?format=1000w" />

Chart of the Week

These are all the numbers you need to recognize that social media use continues to increase . Simon Kemp reports in TNW that "the number of people around the world using social media grew by more than 100 million in the first three months of 2018, reaching almost 3.3 billion by the end of March." In the year since 2017, the number of internet users has gone up by 7.0%, active social media users by 13.0%, unique mobile users by 2.0% and active mobile users by 14.0%

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Snapchat

Four months after introducing its Lens Studio platform which allowed creators to build augmented reality objects or 'world lenses', Snap is now "releasing Continue reading "Social Web Recap 23.04.18"

Social Web Recap 01.01.18

A weekly annotated short summary of significant social web platform developments from the previous week, with links and carping marginalia as needed . . . Posted every Monday morning or thereabouts.
          <img class="thumb-image" alt="Screen Shot 2017-12-29 at 2.52.36 PM.png" data-image="https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/t/5a469d2ae2c483236cb1374e/1514577202403/Screen+Shot+2017-12-29+at+2.52.36+PM.png" data-image-dimensions="605x593" data-image-focal-point="0.5,0.5" data-load="false" data-image-id="5a469d2ae2c483236cb1374e" data-type="image" src="https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/t/5a469d2ae2c483236cb1374e/1514577202403/Screen+Shot+2017-12-29+at+2.52.36+PM.png?format=1000w" />
The chart of the week above is a prefect introduction to this week's post. It compares the expected preference for online information shopping about brands, products or services in 2018 of Millennials and Generation Z . I hope it doesn't mean you question the integrity of my commitment to reporting on the major social web platform updates for the previous seven days (not much happened between Xmas and New Year's eve except Instagram adding 'Recommended' posts to users' feeds and Snap developing  a‘Stories Everywhere’ feature for sharing content beyond Snapchat ), but posted below are a few by no means exclusive or comprehensive links that take a compact look at what might come in 2018 :)

2018 Predictions

On the advertising business from Continue reading "Social Web Recap 01.01.18"

For Immediate Release 118: Longer tweets, creepy tweets, and tweetstorms

Neville Hobson
For Immediate Release 118: Longer tweets, creepy tweets, and tweetstorms
Phones Shel Holtz and I recorded the December edition of the monthly Hobson & Holtz Report podcast. It is the final FIR episode of 2017: FIR will return on January 8, 2018, in an all-new format. Listen to this episode for details! This month’s topics:
  • A group of UK newspapers using robots to help write stories
  • Research that found higher engagement for tweets that took advantage of the new 280 character count
  • Storify, a great curation tool aimed at journalists, is shutting down
  • GoFundMe is changing the shape of disaster relief
  • The FCC’s comment server was flooded with fake comments
  • Netflix sent out a tweet that many found creepy (but was it really?)
  • Dan York reports on Twitter’s new tweetstorm tool, the new ability to follow hashtags on Instagram, and Facebook opening its AR studio to more people

Continue reading "For Immediate Release 118: Longer tweets, creepy tweets, and tweetstorms"

Should you place your trust in the mainstream media?

Neville Hobson
Should you place your trust in the mainstream media?
Newspapers The results of a survey published last month suggest that journalists believe fake news is creating new trust in traditional media around the world. According to the 2017 Ogilvy Media Influence survey, traditional media was found to be the most trusted news source globally by 52 percent of journalists surveyed across North America, Europe, the Middle East and Asia.
The reporters and producers reflected on the role of social media, company websites and other factors in the importance of trusting traditional news sources. Many agreed that with fake news being such a popular debate, there is an increased need and pressure for stronger reporting in order to re-build trust.
The survey results showed that, globally, Facebook is the number one gatekeeper for news, edging out legacy traditional media sources and significantly outpacing other social networks and digital platforms
Trust
Continue reading "Should you place your trust in the mainstream media?"

Social Web Recap 13.11.17

A weekly annotated short summary of significant social web platform developments from the previous week, with links and carping marginalia as needed . . . Posted every Monday morning or thereabouts.
          <img class="thumb-image" alt="Screen Shot 2017-11-07 at 7.43.54 AM.png" data-image="https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/t/5a01aad4c83025f46736d1a5/1510058714360/Screen+Shot+2017-11-07+at+7.43.54+AM.png" data-image-dimensions="400x547" data-image-focal-point="0.5,0.5" data-load="false" data-image-id="5a01aad4c83025f46736d1a5" data-type="image" src="https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/t/5a01aad4c83025f46736d1a5/1510058714360/Screen+Shot+2017-11-07+at+7.43.54+AM.png?format=1000w" />
In keeping with last week's theme of changes in the architecture of news usage, Pew Research Center reports that the gap between television and online news consumption is narrowing—"The share of Americans who often get news from TV – whether from local TV news, nightly network TV news or cable news – has fallen, while the portion of Americans often getting news online – either from news websites/apps or social media – has grown."

Snapchat

Surely the biggest news last week was the planned redesign of the Snapchat application to make it easier to use (about bloody time) announced by Snap Inc. CEO Evan Spiegel.  According to Business Insider, the key features of the redesign will be a streamlined Continue reading "Social Web Recap 13.11.17"

A Systemic Solution to Fake News? Nope.

          <img class="thumb-image" alt="Screen Shot 2017-10-19 at 9.12.29 AM.png" data-image="https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/t/59e8a4e10abd04afa67d71f7/1508418795992/Screen+Shot+2017-10-19+at+9.12.29+AM.png" data-image-dimensions="861x600" data-image-focal-point="0.5,0.5" data-load="false" data-image-id="59e8a4e10abd04afa67d71f7" data-type="image" src="https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/t/59e8a4e10abd04afa67d71f7/1508418795992/Screen+Shot+2017-10-19+at+9.12.29+AM.png?format=1000w" />
During the Indian rebellion of the late 19th century, the British government needed to build popular support for crushing an uprising against the British East India Company. It used news reports of purported brutality to inflame anti-Indian sentiment:   
The British grossly exaggerated—and sometimes completely fabricated—tales of Indian men raping English women and girls. The stories were intended to illustrate the savagery of the Indian people and reinforce the notion of “the white man’s burden” to rule, induce order, and instil culture in less civilized peoples who could not be trusted to rule themselves.
In describing the revolt of various branches of the Indian army, The Guardian newspaper at the time referred to "overt acts of mutiny" among "these excitable and suspicious Orientals." Around 450 B.C., the Greek general Themistocles engaged in a disinformation campaign to convince Persian King Xerxes that the Greek army wasn't up for a fight. Continue reading "A Systemic Solution to Fake News? Nope."

Social Web Recap 11.09.17

          <img class="thumb-image" alt="Screen Shot 2017-09-03 at 8.01.15 AM.png" data-image="https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/t/59abef62d55b41cd8b0df748/1504440172810/Screen+Shot+2017-09-03+at+8.01.15+AM.png" data-image-dimensions="729x723" data-image-focal-point="0.5,0.5" data-load="false" data-image-id="59abef62d55b41cd8b0df748" data-type="image" src="https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/t/59abef62d55b41cd8b0df748/1504440172810/Screen+Shot+2017-09-03+at+8.01.15+AM.png?format=1000w" />
(A painting by Austrian expressionist Egon Schiele, with whom I became fascinated after seeing his works in Vienna recently, courtesy of http://www.doc.ic.ac.uk/~svb/Schiele/ ) A weekly annotated short summary of significant social web platform developments from the previous week, with links and carping marginalia as needed . . . Posted every Monday morning or thereabouts.

Just Sayin' Sidebar

For the luddites who still slag social, I can't resist pointing out the social web is a news powerhouse! "More than two-thirds of American adults — 67 percent, to be exact — 'get at least some of their news on social media,' according to new data released Thursday by Pew Research Center. That’s up from 62 percent of American adults in 2016. Surprisingly, many of those new social media news consumers are not millennials. Pew found that 55 percent of Americans 50 or older reported getting news on social media sites, up from Continue reading "Social Web Recap 11.09.17"

SDF podcast 10: Big Data is never a be-all and end-all

NHC
SDF podcast 10: Big Data is never a be-all and end-all
Big Data Amid congressional hearings and FBI investigations in the US about whether and how Russia interfered with the US Presidential Elections, discussions continue about the efficacy and ethics of micro-targeting voters. In our latest and 10th edition of the SmallDataForum podcast, Neville, Sam and Thomas reflect on the outcome of the recent general elections in the UK. This episode’s show notes were written by Thomas Stoeckle. We agree that, unlike last time, Labour did better than the Conservatives digitally at this election. In combining doorstep campaigning with digital targeting in marginal seats (based on the insights from their proprietary software) and generally being on the ball with issues online, Labour managed to connect the dots more successfully than the Conservatives. This Amazon- or Netflix-style micro-targeting is seen by some as a ‘dark art’. But as Sam points
Download LexisNexis PR ebook
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Social Web Recap 24.07.17

          <img class="thumb-image" data-image="https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/t/596e1a646a4963dc067d43d6/1500387945876/" data-image-dimensions="640x452" data-image-focal-point="0.5,0.5" data-load="false" data-image-id="596e1a646a4963dc067d43d6" data-type="image" src="https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/t/596e1a646a4963dc067d43d6/1500387945876/?format=1000w" />
A weekly annotated short summary of significant social web platform developments from the previous week, with links and carping marginalia as needed . . . Posted every Monday morning or thereabouts.

Amazon

I don't think of Amazon as a social network in the way of Facebook or Snapchat. But some do, and the more it makes moves like its latest—a standalone messaging app called Anytime still in embryo—the more it can be thought of as one. AFTV News reports that "Amazon has begun surveying customers about a new messaging service to gauge which features are most important to users. It’s unclear how far along the new service is, but one customer said the survey seemed to imply it was a ready product." Amazon is also going after video publishers who use Facebook and YouTube as their distribution channels.  Late  last year, "Amazon opened up its Prime streaming platform to video publishers Continue reading "Social Web Recap 24.07.17"

Social Web Recap 10.07.17

          <img class="thumb-image" data-image="https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/t/595e2eceebbd1ae4d461e722/1499344595678/" data-image-dimensions="640x452" data-image-focal-point="0.5,0.5" data-load="false" data-image-id="595e2eceebbd1ae4d461e722" data-type="image" src="https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/t/595e2eceebbd1ae4d461e722/1499344595678/?format=1000w" />
A weekly annotated one-two sentence summary of significant social web platform developments from the previous week, with links and carping marginalia as needed . . . Posted every Monday morning or thereabouts.

Instagram

In a smart update to Instagram Stories, users can now reply to a story with a photo or video. By tapping a new camera icon, while watching a friend's story, users can comment visually, still add face filters, stickers and hashtags as well as a new story 'sticker' that "you can move around and resize."

Facebook

Word has it that Facebook is working on a Houseparty look-alike, an app popular among teens that "notifies a user’s friends whenever they have the app open, inviting them to hang out virtually on their smartphones." Possibly called 'Bonfire', it could be released as early as this fall.

Snapchat

Techcrunch reports that "Snapchat is breaking its long-standing “no links” rule today while Continue reading "Social Web Recap 10.07.17"

Incidental Exposure to News SpellsTrouble for Filter Bubble Theory

          <img class="thumb-image" alt="Image courtesy of Stevepb at Pixabay.com" data-image="https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/t/595e4036893fc096bb850b97/1499349173958/" data-image-dimensions="320x266" data-image-focal-point="0.5,0.5" data-load="false" data-image-id="595e4036893fc096bb850b97" data-type="image" src="https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/t/595e4036893fc096bb850b97/1499349173958/?format=1000w" />





        <a href="https://pixabay.com/en/users/stevepb-282134/">Image courtesy of Stevepb at Pixabay.com</a>
The perception that our ideas and judgments have become slaves to social web 'filter bubbles' or 'echo chambers' (or how about cones of homogeneity?) has become folklore. Even Bill Gates raised concerns this year about the deleterious effects of having our worldviews mirrored back to us thanks to algorithmic and personal exclusion of news and opinions that diverge from what we in our guts think to be true. I've argued otherwise. But my bias has been no match against a Gates or Eli Pariser ('The Filter Bubble: What the Internet Is Hiding from You') even when some studies going back at least three years suggest that news consumption and the psychology of opinion-forming is far more entangled. But I'm not surrendering to the mythos. Once again, a comprehensive study released this week—2017 Reuters Institute Digital News Report and The
Continue reading "Incidental Exposure to News SpellsTrouble for Filter Bubble Theory"

How to get the media on board to end AVE

NHC
How to get the media on board to end AVE
Fearless Girl One of the hurdles along the road of seeing an end to the “advertising value equivalence” (AVE) measurement metric that’s decried by many in the PR and measurement communities is persuading organisations to stop using it. The issue with AVE is well summarised in a white paper published by The Institute for Public Relations in 2003, in which this succinct text appears:
We urge you to move away as quickly as possible from statements of the nature, “Our news coverage this quarter was worth $X million in advertising.” Instead, talk about how you achieved your prominence goal, how your coverage gained in prominence over the year, or how you beat out your competitors in terms of the prominence of your coverage.
Calls to action within the PR community to stop using AVE can only go so far –
Fearless Girl AVE / Bloomberg Businessweek
AdWeek
Continue reading "How to get the media on board to end AVE"

Social Web Recap 26.06.17

          <img class="thumb-image" data-image="https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/t/594e3c1929687fb89ae7ded2/1498299424239/" data-image-dimensions="640x452" data-image-focal-point="0.5,0.5" data-load="false" data-image-id="594e3c1929687fb89ae7ded2" data-type="image" src="https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/t/594e3c1929687fb89ae7ded2/1498299424239/?format=1000w" />
A weekly annotated one-two sentence summary of significant social web platform developments from the previous week, with links and carping marginalia as needed . . . Posted every Monday morning or thereabouts.

YouTube

In its ongoing efforts to stave off video creation challenges thrown up by Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook and Twitter, YouTube is updating its mobile app to "better support video shot in other formats and orientations . . . the software itself (will) adapt to play the video in the appropriate way, instead of trying to cram differently sized videos into one fixed area of the app because of technical constraints." In other words, the YouTube player will adjust its orientation to how the viewer is watching the video.

Snapchat

The big news this week was Snapchat's introduction of Snap Map, and the immediate critical reaction from some to its threat to privacy. Snap Map allows users to share their location with friends. But Continue reading "Social Web Recap 26.06.17"

[Podcast] Backed Facts vs Fake News

We’re living in the era of fake news, or at least, the fear of fake news. Stories that would have once been reserved for salacious supermarket tabloids are now being shared like wildfire across social media and discussed seriously on the nightly news. It’s bad for readers (who do you trust?) bad for media (how do you prove your credibility?) and bad for businesses, who don’t want to get caught up in a phony but potentially damaging story. Even a fake story could be a massive PR risk. In this week’s Hacks and Flacks, March VP Meredith L. Eaton and Content Manager Andrew Grzywacz break down the fake news phenomenon. Meredith shares crisis communication tips for brands that need to react to a damaging fake story, and we discuss the budding cottage industry of fake news publishers. LINKS:

How Twitter Works – a legal opinion

NevilleHobson.com
How Twitter Works – a legal opinion

Royal Courts of Justice

Most reasonable people are aware that if you publicly publish something defamatory about someone else that is false, you can be sued for libel. If you lose the legal case, it can be expensive for you in terms of damage to your reputation as well as a financial cost.

(Related: the difference between libel and slander in UK law.)

And I’d add that most reasonable people are also aware that the same rules on libel apply to all methods of public communication, including online.

So, for instance, if you tweet something bad about someone that’s false, they can sue you for libel. Which is precisely what happened in the case of Jack Monroe vs Katie Hopkins, the judgement of which was published on March 10 by the High Court of Justice.

Briefly, the case involved two tweets posted in 2015 by Katie Hopkins

Continue reading "How Twitter Works – a legal opinion"

Poor Media Literacy Spawns Fake News Successes

4146974105_cf35a96c8c_b Two and half years ago I wrote about failing literacy in America, caused in part by evolving digital media types. The average citizen is losing the ability to understand the written word, and cannot discern quality information online based on text. Never did I imagine that a crisis would come to a fore as quickly as it has with this year’s fake news crisis. In 2014 I wrote, “Part of literacy… is being able to delineate quality information from bad data. In the visual world, that includes producing and consuming quality media in a loud environment.” Since then we have witnessed the election of Donald Trump, Pizzagate, and the general rise of digital fake news. Today, any persona has the ability to dismiss any other group or media outlet as biased. As a result, less trust exists for the media. Even triangulating the facts behind a story does
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