#MeasurePR Memory (August 2018): Travel and Tourism Edition


This post is by Guest Contributor from Shonali Burke Consulting


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#measurePR Editor’s Note: While #measurePR is on hiatus as of this writing, we couldn’t forgo the opportunity to share a recap of a fabulous chat from last year for all who may benefit. Enjoy!  Guest Post by Danielle Heiny The sky’s the limit when it comes to creativity in the travel and tourism industry! Back in August 2018, we had three incredible industry guests, who shared how they uniquely measure PR and marketing.

Too Soon To Declare Victory


This post is by Jim Horton from Online Public Relations Thoughts


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This article posits that Joe Biden is only running against himself and not the other 22+ candidates for President in the Democratic party.  But, it is too soon to declare him the front-runner.  There are an innumerable series of PR and publicity gaffes that can occur before the first primaries in 2020.  Biden has been involved in many of them through his career as a politician.  He was looked upon as a joke, and he still must apologize for his excessive touching and hugging of both genders.  At this stage of the race, it pays to run scared and work unceasingly. There is never enough time to be better known, even if a former vice president.  Biden might be husbanding his energy because he is no longer young, but that could well work against him if the electorate decides it needs a vibrant candidate.  Continue reading "Too Soon To Declare Victory"

Social Media Update 03.06.19


This post is by Boyd Neil from Boyd Neil


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A weekly annotated curation of significant social web platform developments from the previous week, with links and carping marginalia as needed . . . Posted every Monday morning or thereabouts.  

          <img class="thumb-image" data-image="https://images.squarespace-cdn.com/content/v1/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/1559146999982-VDPBYSGWEBW5CN8HDCPQ/ke17ZwdGBToddI8pDm48kDQ7yOigDj3jR72JcEIIs8VZw-zPPgdn4jUwVcJE1ZvWQUxwkmyExglNqGp0IvTJZamWLI2zvYWH8K3-s_4yszcp2ryTI0HqTOaaUohrI8PI71T-1gjvMHuz42qfAvENsuUVraMe1I0xnt1L4kW6EF0/Screen+Shot+2019-05-29+at+12.21.28+PM.png" data-image-dimensions="796x457" data-image-focal-point="0.5,0.5" alt="Screen Shot 2019-05-29 at 12.21.28 PM.png" data-load="false" data-image-id="5ceeb1f7e2c48379c66a4444" data-type="image" src="https://images.squarespace-cdn.com/content/v1/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/1559146999982-VDPBYSGWEBW5CN8HDCPQ/ke17ZwdGBToddI8pDm48kDQ7yOigDj3jR72JcEIIs8VZw-zPPgdn4jUwVcJE1ZvWQUxwkmyExglNqGp0IvTJZamWLI2zvYWH8K3-s_4yszcp2ryTI0HqTOaaUohrI8PI71T-1gjvMHuz42qfAvENsuUVraMe1I0xnt1L4kW6EF0/Screen+Shot+2019-05-29+at+12.21.28+PM.png?format=1000w" />

          <img class="thumb-image" data-image="https://images.squarespace-cdn.com/content/v1/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/1559227295714-7GZ67XVJX8Z3BA3P5EPY/ke17ZwdGBToddI8pDm48kBTWFRes-7Dx3h6_FXwEDxxZw-zPPgdn4jUwVcJE1ZvWQUxwkmyExglNqGp0IvTJZUJFbgE-7XRK3dMEBRBhUpxMqw_8sfcLiBjvM0u9okqbW66ygFmaHXAoIPiboHEhFd3VAYpHa7qalUft-8Tr-iI/Screen+Shot+2019-05-30+at+10.23.15+AM.png" data-image-dimensions="592x309" data-image-focal-point="0.5,0.5" alt="Screen Shot 2019-05-30 at 10.23.15 AM.png" data-load="false" data-image-id="5cefeb9f120c040001cb841c" data-type="image" src="https://images.squarespace-cdn.com/content/v1/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/1559227295714-7GZ67XVJX8Z3BA3P5EPY/ke17ZwdGBToddI8pDm48kBTWFRes-7Dx3h6_FXwEDxxZw-zPPgdn4jUwVcJE1ZvWQUxwkmyExglNqGp0IvTJZUJFbgE-7XRK3dMEBRBhUpxMqw_8sfcLiBjvM0u9okqbW66ygFmaHXAoIPiboHEhFd3VAYpHa7qalUft-8Tr-iI/Screen+Shot+2019-05-30+at+10.23.15+AM.png?format=1000w" />

Love the Numbers

The first study, reported recently in a Nieman Lab article by John Wihbey called ‘Journalists know they need to get better with data and statistics, but they have a long way to go’, found that there “was a modest correlation between the partisanship of the personal network a journalist follows on Twitter and the content she produces . . . There is solid evidence of partisan segregation stretching across the news and social media worlds, and society should be worried about trends that might make polarization worse over time.”

The second chart—based on a UK study by Ofcomm called Online Nation 2019— is of more concern given what it says about the prevalence of online harassment and ‘potentially harmful Continue reading "Social Media Update 03.06.19"

The History of Business Phone Service


This post is by Brian Solis from Brian Solis


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The future of business phone service lies in the history of Voice over Internet Protocol or VoIP. Introduced in 1973, VoIP is a form of the electrical telecommunication system. A technology used to send and receive phone calls via an Internet connection. It no longer warrants the need for a landline or phone service. The many contributions to the tech industry, over the years, are what led businesses to the doors of VoIP. Without these certain inventions, the new business communication system would cease to exist. Thus, to gain a better understanding of how VoIP came to be, we must go back to learn more about what came before the invention of VoIP. What Came Before VoIP?
Pre-Electrical Telecommunication Systems
Electrical Telecommunication Systems
The Major Inventions Which Led To VoIP
How the Business Phone System Meets VoIP
What is PBX?
The Business Phone System Becomes Acquainted with PBX
PBX Plus
Continue reading "The History of Business Phone Service"

FIR 183: Let’s get personal


This post is by neville@nevillehobson.com (Neville Hobson) from Neville Hobson


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The May 2019 edition of “The Hobson and Holtz Report,” aka For Immediate Release episode 183, features Neville Hobson and Shel Holtz talking about these stories:
  • A trio of technologies — from Google, Amazon, and The New York Times — show how marketers will be able to get into your head, assess your emotional state, and manipulate your intent.
  • GDPR is one year old. Has it succeeded in protecting Europeans’ privacy?
  • PR professionals are relegating earned media to the dustbin.
  • Arabic podcasts are on the rise, embracing a long tradition of oral storytelling.
  • More CEOs were terminated in 2018 over ethical lapses than financial performance.
  • The Wall Street Journal is limiting comments to paying subscribers, and it’s working.
  • Dan York reports on a new podcast report from Andreesen-Horowitz and looks at two podcast announcements from Spotify.
Special thanks to Jay Moonah for the opening and closing music.

Listen Now

Continue reading "FIR 183: Let’s get personal"

FIR 183: Let’s get personal


This post is by neville@nevillehobson.com (Neville Hobson) from Neville Hobson


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The May 2019 edition of “The Hobson and Holtz Report,” aka For Immediate Release episode 183, features Neville Hobson and Shel Holtz talking about these stories:
  • A trio of technologies — from Google, Amazon, and The New York Times — show how marketers will be able to get into your head, assess your emotional state, and manipulate your intent.
  • GDPR is one year old. Has it succeeded in protecting Europeans’ privacy?
  • PR professionals are relegating earned media to the dustbin.
  • Arabic podcasts are on the rise, embracing a long tradition of oral storytelling.
  • More CEOs were terminated in 2018 over ethical lapses than financial performance.
  • The Wall Street Journal is limiting comments to paying subscribers, and it’s working.
  • Dan York reports on a new podcast report from Andreesen-Horowitz and looks at two podcast announcements from Spotify.
Special thanks to Jay Moonah for the opening and closing music.

Listen Now

Continue reading "FIR 183: Let’s get personal"

Dumb


This post is by Jim Horton from Online Public Relations Thoughts


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




It doesn't pay to upset Wikipedia editors.  They'll have it in for you.  That is why this stunt was dumb.  North Face, the clothing manufacturer, changed the visuals on its Wikipedia page to advertising images of its clothing.  Worse, it boasted about it.  Retribution was swift, and North Face has apologized.  Well it should.  It was a bad idea from the start and showed a profound lack of understanding of the encyclopedic site and its volunteers.  What did North Face gain from its actions?  A hit to its reputation.  Was it worth it?  Of course not.  It's not always possible to trace the course of a mistake like this to the source, but North Face said it was for its Brazilian office.  Someone in its marketing agency somewhere is keeping a low profile, and that's as it should be.

Web Site Advocacy


This post is by Jim Horton from Online Public Relations Thoughts


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Apple launched a web site to combat allegations that its App Store is a monopoly that hinders competition.  It reads like an advocacy ad one might read in The New York Times or The Wall Street Journal.  It's questionable whether the extended screed will change anyone's mind, particularly those who have had their software rejected from the App Store.  Apple has run afoul of the law already with a Supreme Court case that went against it, and developers have not stopped criticizing the company.  One wonders why the corporation bothered to put up a such a site -- one long page that requires extensive scrolling.  It is not an example of good design and as convincing as the language may be, who is going to read through all of it?  The site might be targeted to developers and not the public at large, but Continue reading "Web Site Advocacy"

The client from hell


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Every agency has had its fair share of truly horrific clients.  You know the ones I mean: the screamers, gropers, the ones who keep losing the invoice that’s already 180-days old. And then there are those who poach your talent but never ask permission or compensate you for the loss (despite contractural wording to the contrary). My two favorites were a retail chain that told us they were reallocating our money to expand their internal IT infrastructure, and an industry group that replaced our budget to sponsor a rock group’s tour (FYI: Our program for the concert lovers has been named a finalist for three separate major awards). But I digress. I have to say that after reading John Carreyrou’s spellbinding book about Theranos and founder Elizabeth Holmes, “Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Start-Up,” I am equal parts empathetic and appalled by the actions of
Continue reading "The client from hell"

NIMBY


This post is by from Online Public Relations Thoughts


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Not In My Back Yard (NIMBY) is a public relations statement.  It reveals the intent of the speaker and one's true stance on an issue.  In the case of affordable housing, it demonstrates practical racism, such as this case.  Wealthy Connecticut towns have stalled higher-density building projects for as long as 30 years through use of zoning and citizen protest. The rich don't want to deal with the poor who are largely minorities.  These are people who apparently believe they are even handed unless building takes place in their communities.  Then, suddenly, it is different.  So, the lower middle class and poor are pushed into communities that exacerbate the gap between have and have-nots.  There is no good way to break down this kind of racism   Persuasion is futile and legal action is the only recourse.  

Undercut


This post is by from Online Public Relations Thoughts


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It is a difficult PR and reputation situation when a successor is undercut by a former boss.  That is what is happening in Germany.  Angela Merkel, the chancellor, has apparently decided that her chosen subordinate is not up to the job of running the Christian Democratic Union.  The CDU has stumbled since Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer took over from Merkel last December.  There was a failed power grab and a botched national election.  Now, Merkel is faced with political difficulty all around and she can't depend on her chosen one.  So,what are she and AKK to do?  It is too late to try a turnaround although Merkel has apparently decided to remain in office for her full term.  The upshot is a mess for everyone concerned.  The two are fated to live uncomfortably side by side and only when Merkel steps down will the situation be resolved.

Agility is the Key to Relevance


This post is by Brian Solis from Brian Solis


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On the importance of agility… Agility is a way of thinking and working. It’s an open and aspirational mindset, perspective and constant series of actions that incessantly seek to deliver new value to evolving markets. Agility is the key to relevance.

Brian Solis, Author, Speaker, Futurist

Brian Solis is principal analyst and futurist at Altimeter, the digital analyst group at Prophet, Brian is a world renowned keynote speakerand 8x best-selling author. In his new book, Lifescale: How to live a more creative, productive and happy life, Brian tackles the struggles of living in a world rife with constant digital distractions. His model for “Lifescaling” helps readers overcome the unforeseen consequences of living a digital life to break away from diversions, focus on what’s important, spark newfound creativity and unlock new possibilities. His previous book, X: The Experience When Business Meets Design, explores the future of brand and
Continue reading "Agility is the Key to Relevance"

Social Media Update 27.05.19


This post is by from Boyd Neil


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




A weekly annotated curation of significant social web platform developments from the previous week, with links and carping marginalia as needed . . . Posted every Monday morning or thereabouts.  

          <img class="thumb-image" data-image="https://images.squarespace-cdn.com/content/v1/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/1558623519282-R6L19FIYG80ZFB49FMKG/ke17ZwdGBToddI8pDm48kFDJpSyrzHgPnqsNOFXSTrdZw-zPPgdn4jUwVcJE1ZvWQUxwkmyExglNqGp0IvTJZUJFbgE-7XRK3dMEBRBhUpzB4z0gwqNzj4TrCm9FCLiCoVfQ0XdnMIR0uKrOQhkjeHok3UHclLEO0-5u77m1oo4/Screen+Shot+2019-05-23+at+10.56.23+AM.png" data-image-dimensions="589x319" data-image-focal-point="0.5,0.5" alt="Screen Shot 2019-05-23 at 10.56.23 AM.png" data-load="false" data-image-id="5ce6b51fe79c7097af70239e" data-type="image" src="https://images.squarespace-cdn.com/content/v1/5821cd7e5016e1bf5d3ebcea/1558623519282-R6L19FIYG80ZFB49FMKG/ke17ZwdGBToddI8pDm48kFDJpSyrzHgPnqsNOFXSTrdZw-zPPgdn4jUwVcJE1ZvWQUxwkmyExglNqGp0IvTJZUJFbgE-7XRK3dMEBRBhUpzB4z0gwqNzj4TrCm9FCLiCoVfQ0XdnMIR0uKrOQhkjeHok3UHclLEO0-5u77m1oo4/Screen+Shot+2019-05-23+at+10.56.23+AM.png?format=1000w" />

Another Pew Research Center study released May 2, 2019 proves again that Millennials are technology usage leaders and early adopters, although older generations also “embrace digital life.” When it comes to social media use “the vast majority of Millennials (85%) say they use social media . . . (and) significantly larger shares of Millennials have adopted relatively new platforms such as Instagram (52%) and Snapchat (47%) than older generations have.” The Pew report goes on to say, however, that “there has also been significant growth in tech adoption in recent years among older generations – particularly Gen Xers and Baby Boomers.”

TikTok

The upstart video app TikTok will likely be launching a music streaming app called ByteDance that would be a Spotify Continue reading "Social Media Update 27.05.19"

Reputation And Taxation


This post is by from Online Public Relations Thoughts


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TurboTax is making a name for itself, and it is not good.  According to this article, the company is tricking members of the military service into paying for filing their taxes although it is supposed to be free.  If true, the company deserves a poor reputation.  Why do corporations persist in the internet age in trying to cheat customers?  They can't away with it for long and when discovered, they have explaining to do.  The explanations usually ring hollow.  In TurboTax's case, the company has to reveal why it buried the free page beneath others, and why it intentionally diverted customers to pages with for-pay services.  The company says it stands by its dedication to the military soldiers, sailors and marines.  If it does, it seems to have an odd way of showing it.

Volunteers Make The World Go Round: Communicating Effectively for Impact


This post is by Guest Contributor from Shonali Burke Consulting


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Guest Post by Paula Newbaker Volunteering is good for everyone! Your nonprofit, your employees, the cause and the volunteers themselves! In fact, it has been scientifically proven that volunteering is good for your health. Evidence of volunteerism’s physical effects can be found in a study from Carnegie Mellon University, published in 2013 in Psychology and Aging. Adults over age 50 who volunteered on a regular basis were less likely to develop high blood pressure than non-volunteers. A study released by Johns Hopkins University in 2009 revealed that volunteers increased their brain functioning. Volunteer activities get you moving and thinking at the same time as well as reduce stress levels. By savoring your time spent in service to others, you’ll feel a sense of meaning and appreciation—both given and received—which can be calming.
So one literally does “Keep calm and volunteer!”
Whether your organization is large or small, chances
paulanewbaker
Continue reading "Volunteers Make The World Go Round: Communicating Effectively for Impact"

Volunteers Make The World Go Round: Communicating Effectively for Impact


This post is by Guest Contributor from Shonali Burke Consulting


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Guest Post by Paula Newbaker Volunteering is good for everyone! Your nonprofit, your employees, the cause and the volunteers themselves! In fact, it has been scientifically proven that volunteering is good for your health. Evidence of volunteerism’s physical effects can be found in a study from Carnegie Mellon University, published in 2013 in Psychology and Aging. Adults over age 50 who volunteered on a regular basis were less likely to develop high blood pressure than non-volunteers. A study released by Johns Hopkins University in 2009 revealed that volunteers increased their brain functioning. Volunteer activities get you moving and thinking at the same time as well as reduce stress levels. By savoring your time spent in service to others, you’ll feel a sense of meaning and appreciation—both given and received—which can be calming.
So one literally does “Keep calm and volunteer!”
Whether your organization is large or small, chances
paulanewbaker
Continue reading "Volunteers Make The World Go Round: Communicating Effectively for Impact"

Was It Always This Way?


This post is by from Online Public Relations Thoughts


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General Electric's CEO is trying to stop infighting between divisions and to focus the corporation on quality and management.  The question arises whether it was always this way, even under the legendary Jack Welch?  A company that is turning out profits can cover a lot of sins.  When the money machine stops, all sorts of problems surface and a vaunted management style is found wanting.  One can point at Jeff Immelt and say he wrecked the company during his tenure as CEO and chairman, but that would be too easy.  Welch left a company that was overly dependent on its finance division, which ran aground during the meltdown of 2008/2009.  Today, GE is a shadow of its once greatness.  Larry Culp has set goals for its slow turnaround, but there is little chance that it will regain its reputation for greatness, and the Continue reading "Was It Always This Way?"

Not Dead Yet


This post is by from Online Public Relations Thoughts


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What happens to an electronic product that died of bad PR?  Usually, one never sees it again.  But, the Google Glass has discovered a new life as an enterprise item to use while working in factories, doing maintenance and repair and other work.  It doesn't take much recall to remember how it was hyped as a consumer gadget, how it went into distribution and how it failed spectacularly, largely because of privacy concerns.  Give Google credit.  It didn't give up. Rather, it improved the Glass, found a niche for it and started marketing it again.  They have been successful enough to spin it off internally as a new company.  It might never be introduced to the public again, but it can claim a life as a B to B offering and do well.  That's quite a turnaround from a few years ago.

There Isn’t an App for That: The Formula for Productivity, Happiness and Creativity Starts Within


This post is by Brian Solis from Brian Solis


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We didn’t lose our ability to focus or be creative, we were programmed away from it, toward a direction where our attention is heavily monetized. It’s by design.  The challenge is two fold. For those who remember life before smartphones and social media, memories serve as a benchmark for comparison. We tend to remember our analog lives and activities with a sense of nostalgia and also disbelief. After all, we’ve since learned to become digital-first in most things we do now. On the other hand, there’s an entire generation who were practically born online. Their pictures, while even in the womb, are proudly plastered all over the web without their consent or without consideration of the detailed, searchable history that will now follow them for the rest of their life. At the same time, they’re given tablets as toddlers and smartphones as gradeschoolers. These are the true digital-natives. Either
Continue reading "There Isn’t an App for That: The Formula for Productivity, Happiness and Creativity Starts Within"

“You can pay me now or pay me later”


This post is by from Rep Man


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To mix metaphors, a brand’s reputation is only as strong as its weakest link. Case in point is the recent donnybrook surrounding the backlash from the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s accepting donations from the infamous Sackler family The Sackler Family owns Purdue Pharmaceuticals which manufacturers OxyContin. Just recently, the family had to pay the state of Oklahoma $270 million as part of a settlement in which they were accused of aggressively marketing the highly addictive painkiller that has laid waste to generations ranging from pre-teens to Octogenarians. Last week’s backlash against the Met and the museum’s decision to no longer take donations from “members of the Sackler family presently associated with Purdue Pharma, the manufacturer of OxyContin,” is indicative of the mega exposure that for-profit corporations and non-profits institutions alike now face: Have they invested in questionable business concerns or, as was the case with the Met, has an
Continue reading "“You can pay me now or pay me later”"